1 Timeline: War of Spanish Succession or Queen Anne’s War

For our little ones:  This was a war that started when the powerful Spanish king died and left no one to take his place.  Several countries like England, Austria, and France decided to try to gain Spain’s land for themselves.  The war spread to America.  In the end, the Treaty of Utrect in 1714 balanced the nations at war and gave them fairly equal territories.  Canada became mostly English and many French moved from Canada to Louisiana.  The treaty and the end of the war marked the beginning of England’s rise in power.

Resources:

4 minute video of War of Spanish Succession

3 minute video of War of Spanish Succession

Synopsis:

War of the Spanish Succession, (1701–14), conflict that arose out of the disputed succession to the throne of Spain following the death of the childless Charles II, the last of the Spanish Habsburgs. In an effort to regulate the impending succession, to which there were three principal claimants, England, the Dutch Republic, and France had in October 1698 signed the First Treaty of Partition, agreeing that on the death of Charles II, Prince Joseph Ferdinand, son of the elector of Bavaria, should inherit Spain, the Spanish Netherlands, and the Spanish colonies. Spain’s Italian dependencies would be detached and partitioned between Austria (to be awarded the Duchy of Milan) and France (Naples and Sicily). In February 1699, however, Joseph Ferdinand died. A second treaty, signed on June 11, 1699, by England and France and in March 1700 by the Dutch Republic, awarded Spain and the Spanish Netherlands and colonies to Archduke Charles, second son of the Holy Roman emperor Leopold I, and Naples, Sicily, and other Spanish territories in Italy to France. Leopold, however, refused to sign the treaty, demanding that Charles receive all the Spanish territories intact. The Spanish grandees likewise did not recognize it, being unalterably opposed to partition. Charles II allowed himself to be convinced that only the House of Bourbon had the power to keep the Spanish possessions intact, and in the autumn of 1700 he made a will bequeathing them to Philip, duc d’Anjou, grandson of Louis XIV of France.

 

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